How To Get Traffic To Your Blog With Targeted Longtail Keywords

SEO Keyword Research

If you’re interested in how to get traffic to your blog, you might think social media is the best way to drive viewers to your site. But there are alternatives—you can gain blog traffic through Ye Olde Fashioned keyword association. The trick is finding the specific longtail keywords your audience is interested in.
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This tactic reverse engineers the blogging experience to meet the needs of the reader and allows you to discover what people are searching for that relates to your product, service, or niche. Longtail keyword research can be used for literally anything, though some topics and search phrases will have more search volume than others.

Longtail needles in a haystack

You have to find the gems of longtail keywords that still have a relatively high search volume. These phrases can be easily worn with a blog post because they are much more specific than fathead terms, but many websites don’t know they’re ranking for them. With the right mix of content and SEO, you can easily overtake the poor schmucks who are accidentally getting traffic from a random assortment of words on a deep product page.

A marketing agency trying to draw readers with its blog will want to write more about marketing tactics. However, a blog post that’s only optimized for the term “marketing” just isn’t going to fly—there’s way too much competition out there. But how do you find the longtail phrases users are searching for?

With various research tools, I compiled a list of keywords that our competitors were ranking for. Then, I used a custom Excel macro to remove all of the keywords in the first column that contained two words or less. This leaves me with the longtail keywords that my competitors’ visitors are interested in.

Finding the right longtail phrases

I wanted to provide a utility for my readers with this blog post, so I filtered the first column of keywords down to the phrases containing the word, “how.” As you can see below, it generated a massive list of questions that my audience is interested in. And one of the longest questions in the list, with a search volume of 480 (average for a whole year, currently at 1,000 a month) is the phrase, “how to get traffic to your blog.” Bingo.

With this tool, I’ve found the questions users are asking and how to answer them appropriately in a blog post. Use this to optimize SEO for the phrase, and watch the traffic roll in.

This tactic can be used for blog recommendations, co-occurrence phrases, FAQ sections, earned media topics, social media topics, infographics—literally anything you can imagine. Through longtail tactics, you can pull in visitors through multiple touchpoints, all of whom are highly qualified to interact with your website and potentially convert. Not to mention the fact that by covering a more specified topic within marketing, you will naturally cover the larger keywords like “SEO” and “Website Optimization” without having to stuff your content like an amateur.

Still curious about the importance of longtail keywords? DigitalRelevance did a case study covering the importance of more specified longtail keywords, and how thousands of low traffic phrases pull in more traffic to your site overall than fat head terms. This case study got me interested in the subject and digging deeper into longtail tactics.

If you’re interested in trying out this tactic for yourself, you can explore Google AdWords’ keyword tool. It’s free to use and can give you keywords that are related to the ones you are searching for. Start by typing in the subject matter that your blog covers and Google will generate a list of keywords that you can export that it considers similar. From here you can filter out the smaller keywords, and look for phrases containing “What,” “How,” and “Free” among others. Happy hunting!

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